New Thameslink Train Routes for 2018

New Thameslink Train Routes for 2018

I didn't find a quick answer to the questions raised after reading this clickbait-titled article from the evening standard. I wanted to know where the new Thameslink routes will stop, and what will be different after they stop their 9 years of construction .

The instant answer is that trains will now be able to go between London Bridge, London Blackfriars and Kings Cross St Pancras. This route is what some are calling the Thameslink Core.

This opens up connections between the Thameslink routes heading from Southern England north to London bridge to all of the Thameslink services heading south from Cambridge (for example) into Kings Cross St Pancras.

I therefore thought I would sum it up for anyone interested:

What changes have been made to the Thameslink Route?

A new viaduct was built over Borough Market and Borough High Street to provide rail routes with their own line between London Bridge and Charing Cross station. This has now been in use since 2016 now.

 The changes to North - South Thameslink Routes due to the Thameslink Programme due to be finished in 2018. (Google Earth)

The changes to North - South Thameslink Routes due to the Thameslink Programme due to be finished in 2018. (Google Earth)

Thameslink 2018 Route Map

Although there is no official Thameslink map in pdf form for the new routes yet, the images below shows what the difference will effectively be.

If you'd prefer to see a map explained by video, please see this Geoff Marshall video on Youtube (starts at the point they're explaining a hand-drawn map)

 Crudely edited version of  the TfL tube and rail map found here

Crudely edited version of the TfL tube and rail map found here

What the Official Thameslink map might look like at the end of 2018

 Crudely edited version of  the official Thameslink map found here

Crudely edited version of the official Thameslink map found here

New Canal Tunnels just north of Kings Cross St Pancras between the Thameslink route and the East Coast Main Line. This therefore opens up Thameslink routes to new destinations north of London.

See the Virgin Trains East Coast route map here

A new junction has also been created at Bermondsey.

With the completion of Borough Market Viaduct to the west of London Bridge, Thameslink trains will use the pair of tracks to the north, and Charing Cross trains will use the new pair of tracks to the south.

What does the new Thameslink Route mean for me?

This year, we will gradually see the introduction of 24 Thameslink trains per hour between Kings Cross St Pancras and Blackfriars, providing a solid rail link across London between the North and South of the UK.

This equates to 1 train every 2mins 30seconds.

This means you'll be able to go from stations like Sutton to stations like Bedford, Peterborough and King's Lynn without changing!

Here's the interactive Thames link map. The important thing to notice is the dotted black line between London Bridge and Kings Cross St Pancras.

New mainline Thameslink routes (via London Bridge) starting 2018

  • Bedford to Brighton
  • Bedford to Gatwick Airport (also via Redhill)
  • Bedford to East Grinstead
  • Bedford to Littlehampton (also via Hove)
  • Peterborough to Horsham (also via Redhill)
  • Cambridge to Brighton (here's a video Geoff Marshall did about this journey)
  • Cambridge to Maidstone East

New metro Thameslink routes (via London Bridge) in 2018

  • Luton to Rainham

New metro Thameslink routes (via Elephant & Castle) available 2018

  • St Albans City to Sutton (via Hackbridge)
  • St Albans City to Sutton (via Wimbledon)
  • Luton (peak only) to Orpington (via Catford)
  • Kentish Town (off peak only) to Orpington (via Catford)
  • Welwyn Garden City (peak only) to Sevenoaks (via Catford and Otford)
  • London Blackfriars (off peak only) to Sevenoaks (via Catford and Otford)

 If you were looking for more information which I haven't given, please post a comment in the box below so I can help the next person looking for the same piece of info you were!

I will be looking into writing on article on why Thameslink hasn't been on the TfL map since 1999 soon, and why this might have to be reconsidered after the line improvements mentioned in this article come into full swing.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thameslink_Programme


Conclusion

  • You'll be able to go north to south through the 'Thameslink Core' up to 24 times per hour during peak times.
  • No maps yet exist to show what the exact routes are, but the above are our best possible guesses.
  • I am not very good at editing transport maps
  • Thameslink have a really unhelpful website regarding how they're progressing with the Thameslink Programme
  • Your commute will hopefully become easier in the months to come!

While you're here

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Please check them out, and consider if such a tool might help your team to have  important conversations in a timely manner.


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